Dr Benjamin Bose, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh will give a lecture "Deciphering a Darkening Universe"
 

The past century of cosmology has taken us through a dawn of deep understanding, through decades steeped in astounding scientific achievement, all the way to a dusky present. We find ourselves in a darkening universe, with one of the biggest problems ever to face physicists -  snuffing out the light, a problem deeply rooted in both experiment and theory. Is there hope for a new dawn? And who, or what, will guide us there? 

In this talk Dr Bose will give a historical account of cosmology over the past 100 years, present the 'biggest problem in physics' and how it connects to our swiftly darkening universe, and finally show how scientists do not plan to go gently into the night. 

The talk will also include a presentation of some very recent research coming out of the Royal Observatory which Dr Bose and others have been working on which might appeal to the more technically minded members of the audience. 

Biography: Dr Benjamin Bose was born in Houston and is of Maltese, Indian and Irish heritage. He moved to Malta when he was seven, where he pursued accounts and economics at 6th form before switching to maths and physics thanks to Che (his pet dog at the time). He completed a Masters in neutron star and black hole physics in 2013 and  then taught English for two years in Malta and Germany. 

Dr Bose moved to Portsmouth for a doctorate in cosmology at the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation in 2014. In 2018 he completed a 6 month fellowship in Kyoto and then moved to Geneva for a post-doctoral position late 2018. In 2022 he moved to Edinburgh as a Stephen Hawking fellow. 

Outside physics Dr Bose has had many interests, but recently has tried to narrow those to bouldering (outdoors when possible!), yoga, meditating, trying to play guitar and spending time with friends and his partner, Linda. 

The lecture will start at 1930 and will be held in Room 6.41 in the Royal College building, University of Strathclyde