Sunday 26 April 2015 - Sun over the Botanics

Our 'Sun Over the Botanics' events are your chance to see the surface of the sun safely. We bring along some special telescopes which are designed for looking at the sun, and allow you to see sunspots, granulation and prominences round the circumference of the sun.  For the technical, we use Coronado PSTs which only pass the Hydrogen-Alpha wavelength of 656nm through with a 0.1nm bandwidth and which cut out 99.999% of the light making it safe to view the sun.  We also use white light filters on normal telescopes which also remove 99.999% of the light but in this case over the whole of the visbile spectrum giving clear views of sunspots.

We also run telescope workshops at these events, so if you've got a telescope sitting in a cupboard somewhere gathering dust, and you'd like to know how to use it, or just get some help setting it up, then bring it along and one of our experts can talk you through your telescope and give you all the help you could need. We're more than happy to help, and will answer any questions you may have.

The event runs from 1pm to 4pm is free to attend. Just turn up on the day, and you'll find us next to the Kibble Palace if it's dry, or inside if it's not. (We hope it's dry but we can't control the Glasgow weather!)

 

Thursday 21st May 2015 - Lecture followed by the Society AGM

Space Medicine
Dr. Gillian Pearce B.Sc (hons) Physics; B.Sc (hons) Biomed. Sci; Ph.D; B.M. B.Ch (Oxon) PGCE(HE); Cert(HE) Theol.& Rel; Cert(HE)Applied Theol;  FSB; FRAS, Keele University.

Since those famous words were spoken by Neil Armstrong when humankind first landed on the Moon, we have continued our quest to explore how humans might live and work in Space.  The unprecedented environment of Space brings its own unique set of challenges.  This talk will examine the problems that humans face in the environment of Space and will also consider the possibilities of life elsewhere in the vast void that we know as the Cosmos.

Bio:
I completed a Ph.D (Supernovae) in 1983, and then went on to completed Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships in Astrophysics at Durham and Birmingham Universities. Following this I was awarded an Atlas Research Fellowship at Oxford University. During my time at Oxford University. I also held a Visiting Scholarship at St John’s College, and have held Visitorships abroad. I have numerous publications in peer reviewed journals, and have presented research at conferences at home and internationally. I was a short-listed Astronaut candidate for JUNO (first Anglo-Soviet Space Mission). I also qualified as a Medical Doctor from Oxford University, and practised in the NHS for a number of years in General Medicine, General Surgery, and Orthopaedics. I have undertaken research in Stroke Medicine and have medical innovations that have lead to patents.  I was fan of the Sky at night programme in my junior years and my parents bought me a telescope at a young age, which inspired me to pursue my passion for Astronomy as a child. My background in Medicine and Astronomy lead me to develop an interest in how humans might live and work in Space, and cope with the problems of this unique environment.  I also confess to being a fan of Star Trek (the original series) and was senior member of the Star Trek society at Oxford University!!!  I look forward to beaming up to Glasgow soon, to meeting with you all again, to delivering my talk, and sharing my enthusiasm for the topic of Humans in the Cosmos.

Location : Room 6.41 Royal College, Strathclyde University.  Access is via the Montrose Street entrance, take the lift to Floor 3, exit the lift and take the 2nd set of steps on your left, go through the double glass doors.  Room 6.41 is on your left approximately half way along the corridor.

 

Thursday 17th September 2015

First lecture of the 2015-16 session

Location : Room 6.41 Royal College, Strathclyde University.  Access is via the Montrose Street entrance, take the lift to Floor 3, exit the lift and take the 2nd set of steps on your left, go through the double glass doors.  Room 6.41 is on your left approximately half way along the corridor.